Restaurant Row to see some big changes

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SALYERSVILLE – This week the Independent talked with the project manager for the Mountain Parkway Expansion project for updates on the four-lane project.

Marshall Carrier, project manager for the Mountain Parkway Expansion for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, said that Magoffin is where the majority of the early construction on the project has been, and they are starting to wrap up the portion west of KY 7. 

Carrier said the Restaurant Row portion will see a lot more work in the upcoming weeks, including more impacts on the traveling public and the business owners. 

He said they are continuing on the construction of the Burning Fork Bridge (west of the intersection of the Parkway and Parkway Drive), with plans to start on the other side of the bridge soon.

The roadwork will continue through 2018 and 2019, with the project still on target to be completed by 2020.

“Our main concern is the traveling public and maintaining access for businesses and residents,” Carrier said. 

With the current utility relocation, he said that can be a challenge, but it is something they remain mindful of.

The KY 7 interchange should be open by the fall of 2018, Carrier said, as well.

He explained that they have been working on three projects at the same time through the initial phases, so they can see more progress over time.

“Just to paint a picture for someone coming into Magoffin that hasn’t been through in a while, they will come to the western edge of the county with about 4 ½ miles of two-lanes, then it will expand into a four-lane at the Gifford interchange, and then some road work past the KY 7 interchange and through Restaurant Row.” 

He explained that they are working on three different segments at the same time, with all three working together simultaneously.

As far as winter weather, he said they can deal with the cold pretty well, but when the ice starts melting and the ground gets saturated, it’s a bit more difficult to continue construction through mud.

Carrier asked people to be mindful of the ongoing construction, the lower speed limits and watch for the signs and flashing lights for the changes.

“We have people working along the shoulders and equipment crossing the roads occasionally, so please watch for the reduced speeds,” Carrier said.

He also wanted to remind people that there are a lot of moving parts, and just because there is no visible construction, a lot of planning development is going on behind the scenes. 

Carrier said the area of the Mountain Parkway around the Gifford Interchange is what the rest of the Parkway will look like after the project is completed. 

He noted that if anyone has any questions, they have social media accounts, as well as keep office hours in Salyersville.